Magpie Nest #2

Magpie nest number #2 San Cristobal NM. This is the second layer of a magpie nest that fell from the juniper tree this fall in the high winds. There are three other stages in the nest: the outer layer of large structural twigs anchoring the nest to the tree limbs; this structure, followed by a layer of decreasing twig sizes; the last layer, a structure of the tiniest twigs resembling horse hair. The eggs are laid on this final delicate structure. More photos to follow. Thanks for looking. G

Magpie nest number #2

Hillside Aspens, Cumbres Pass

Hillside Aspens, Cumbres Pass, Colorado. It was great to see this grove of aspens at it’s peak a week ago, splendid against our stunning southwest sky. We went back a couple of days later when the leaves were more sparse. Conditions in the mountains change rapidly from day to day. Below you’ll find some links I pulled up from previous trips over the Cumbres Pass. Thanks for looking. G

Hillside Aspens, Cumbres Pass

http://geraintsmith.com/tree-grove-sky-cumbres-pass-colorado/

http://geraintsmith.com/the-stand/

Aspen Road, Garcia Park

Aspen road, Garcia Park in the Carson National Forest, New Mexico. The backlighting sets the colors off well but there is still plenty of color to come over the next few weeks. Every day will amount to an “aspencade”. We’ll be checking for stands of color “going off” on the hills and mountainside around Taos, northern New Mexico and southern Colorado. The red scrub oak is already accenting the valleys and arroyos. Soon it will be the mighty cottonwoods along the Rio Grande and it’s tributaries. Then all we’ll need is the scent of cedar and piñon smoke in the air in order to round out this little bit of perfection. Thanks for looking. G

Aspen Road, Garcia Park

Cliffs Along The Rio Chama

Cliffs along the Rio Chama on the road to the Desert Monastery. For sure the tree adds a little scale. In color these cliffs are hues of honey, rosy pinks and rusty browns. There’s a wonderful old “David Bramley” windmill behind where I’m standing. Below are some links to other images in the area. Thanks for looking. G

Cliffs Along The Rio Chama

http://geraintsmith.com/windmill-on-the-rio-chama-road/

http://geraintsmith.com/desert-monastery-road-abiquiu-nm/

http://geraintsmith.com/rio-chama-abiquiu-new-mexico/

http://geraintsmith.com/christ-in-the-desert-monastery/

Blossoms For Earth Day, San Cristobal

Blossoms for Earth Day, San Cristobal, NM. Blossoms for Earth Day, San Cristobal, NM. So I thought I’d post something pretty today for Earth Day, April 22, 2018. The trees are tempted to bust out even though the night time temps are still quite cool.

And a quote … Thanks for looking. G

And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom”.  Anaïs Nin

Blossoms For Earth Day, San Cristobal

Rio Grande Tree, Southern Colorado

Rio Grande tree, southern Colorado. Slightly south of the Lobatos Bridge crossing the Rio Grande, is this old cottonwood tree, a sentinel, surrounded by exposed fractured basalt cliffs along the sides of the river where the gorge begins. The river is frozen in the shadows of the cliffs, though not yet frozen enough to skate or cross country ski on this year! Last week the ice on the embankments was constantly thunder cracking, echoing off the underside off the old steel girder bridge. Thanks for looking. G

Rio Grande tree southern colorado

Desert Monastery Road Abiquiu, NM

Desert Monastery Road Abiquiu, NM. A scene on the road to Christ in the Desert Monastery with a view to Cerro Pedernal, Georgia O’Keeffe’s mountain. Going through the archives again I pulled this one from 2005. I like the feeling of solitude and space. The tree is no longer there and the road has been graded and improved much since then. One thing hasn’t changed. It’s still a great, off the beaten path, road trip. Thanks for looking. G

Desert Monastery Rio Chama To Cerro Pedernal

Catalpa Tree, Santuario de Chimayo, New Mexico

Catalpa tree, Santuario de Chimayo, New Mexico. This is a young catalpa tree at the Santuario in Chimayo. I have always loved catalpa trees. The leaves are shaped like hearts. It is also known as “cigar tree” for it’s cigar-shaped, cylindrical seed pods.

Here is what Wikipedia has to say: It is a relative of the New Mexico Locust (Robinia neomexicana) and other locust varieties also known to be great bee trees. All are in the pea family, so they fix nitrogen and build soils. Catalpa trees have very large leaves and have the potential to be large shade trees.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catalpa

Thanks for looking. G

Catalpa Tree, Santuario de Chimayo, New Mexico