Fine Art Images from the American Southwest

Tag: Birds

Rock Wren, Rocks, Rio Grande Del Norte National Monument, NM

Rock Wren on the rocks in the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument, New Mexico. From the vast landscapes to the smallest creatures that inhabit them, when I show up and paying attention these sights present themselves, without question and without fail, every time. Thanks for looking. G

Rock Wren, Rocks, Rio Grande Del Norte National Monument, NM

Osprey, First Flight, Chama, New Mexico

Osprey, first flight, along the highway power line nesting platform, Chama, New Mexico. A quick drive around the block today. It was very peaceful and delightful, watching these chicks and mom on the nest. Dad is gone, maybe fishing. We spent about an hour observing their behavior. Thanks for looking in. G

Osprey, first flight, Chama, New Mexico.
Who’s going first?

 

Osprey, first flight, Chama, New Mexico.
I’ll give it a shot!

 

Osprey, first flight, Chama, New Mexico.
Look Mama, I’m going for it.

 

Osprey, first flight, Chama, New Mexico.
Go, go, go!

 

Osprey, first flight, Chama, New Mexico.
Whoa!

 

Osprey, first flight, Chama, New Mexico.
About 30 minutes later, mom has left and is calling from a nearby tree. Sister is saying, “wow bro, look at you, that’s awesome.”

 

Song Sparrow, Sangre De Cristo Mountains

Song Sparrow along Comanche Creek (yesterday’s photo) in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of New Mexico. Singing it loud and clear. He certainly got my attention, his song echoing off the canyon walls and hills, accompanied by the babbling brook. Thanks for looking. G

Song Sparrow, Sangre De Cristo Mountains.

Pine Siskin, Shuree Ponds, Valle Vidal, NM

Pine Siskin at the Shuree Ponds in the Valle Vidal, NM. A pleasant little bird and fun to watch during it’s foraging activities, hopping from tree to bush and back to tree again. It has a penchant for hanging upside down, feeding on thistle and fall sunflowers husks. Thanks for looking. G

Pine Siskin at the Shuree Ponds in the Valle Vidal, NM.

Hairy Woodpecker, San Cristobal, NM

Hairy Woodpecker, San Cristobal, NM. Apparently these fellow earth dwellers are destroyers of trees. They have stripped the bark off the limbs on an old growth Juniper tree, making short work of it. Today I noticed they’d enlisted the help of the kids to pitch in as well. Such little buggers. I have to believe there is method in their natural world. Thanks for looking. G

Hairy Woodpecker, San Cristobal, NM

Hairy Woodpecker, San Cristobal, NM.

Cross Birds, Ranchos De Taos, New Mexico

Cross Birds, Ranchos De Taos, New Mexico. Just hopping around, eating, fighting and pooping. “Humans, like all other critters, are neither inherently good or bad. Those words have no meaning in nature.”  Thanks JK and thanks for looking. G

Cross Birds, Ranchos De Taos, NM

Blue Grosbeak, San Cristobal, NM

Blue Grosbeak, San Cristobal, NM. Two years ago a young Blue Grosbeak visited the garden, I haven’t spotted one since, until today. I have no proof it’s the same bird but I like to think it might be. He seems to know his way around the place. Thanks for looking. G

Blue Grosbeak, San Cristobal, NM.

Killdeer, San Luis Valley, Lake, Colorado

Killdeer bird, along a lake shore in the San Luis Valley, southern Colorado. These long legged, little critters weave their way along the edge of the lake, chattering incessantly as they go. They’ll lead me in a direction away from the nest and it’s offspring. Here’s more info on these little guys. Thanks for looking. G

Killdeer, along a lake shore in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

American Kestrel, Arroyo Hondo, New Mexico

American Kestrel, Arroyo Hondo, New Mexico. This beautiful creature embodies spirit. Fear? none of it, I’m sure. I’ve watched and photographed these birds for a couple of decades. I wish to return as a kestrel. Perhaps I already am, and Geraint is a figment of my imagination. Thanks for looking. Be tenacious, stay well and be safe. Thanks for looking. G

American Kestrel, Arroyo Hondo, New Mexico.

Horned Lark, Capulin, Colorado.

Horned Lark, on a fence post in the village of Capulin, Colorado. I did get a close up of this little fellow, but I prefer this image which is how he looked when I first caught a glimpse as we drove past. Here’s a close up of a Horned Lark from last year in the snow. They usually flock in the thousands, foraging around the roadsides and fields. This one was on it’s own and he didn’t seem to mind. Thanks for looking. G

Horned Lark, Capulin, Colorado.