San Luis Valley, Red Barn, Black And White

San Luis Valley, the red barn in black and white with a magnificent sky. Another great day out today, in and around the SLV (as it’s known locally), shooting video for a future project. I’ll let you know how it turns out. When it is done you’ll see it here. Thank you as always for checking in, looking and for all the comments and compliments. G

San Luis Valley, Red Barn, Black and White

San Luis Valley Homestead, Colorado

San Luis Valley homestead, Colorado. A former family home on the plateau long ago deserted, currently frequented by scavengers who steal the copper wiring from the power lines and dwelling. The current owner allowed me access to the property but warned me of snakes. Consider me warned! It’s a lovely stop on my San Luis Valley photo tour, to learn the history and make some images, while pondering a bygone era. Thanks for looking. G

San Luis Valley homestead, Colorado

San Antonio Mountain, New Mexico

San Antonio Mountain, New Mexico with center pivot irrigation system, arching over the mountain. When I saw this scene I had a notion that I might be able to line the two up. I positioned my self and waited for the water stream to recycle. I was lucky that San Antonio Mountain (an extinct volcano, reputed the be the largest free standing mountain in the continental US) remained in the sunlight. Thanks for looking and for joining me in the moment. G

San Antonio Mountain, New Mexico

Ute Mountain, Cattle Hay Trough

Ute Mountain and a hay trough, with no cattle. I can’t say that I’ve ever seen cattle at this dispenser. It’s been here for a long time and I pass it often. It sits here somewhat lonely, forlorn looking. I’ve never stopped to photograph it, but on this day, what with the clouds, sky and all, I pulled over. I watched the shadows pass across the fields and over Ute Mountain, highlighting the feeder, dwarfed by the big sky. Black and white seemed like a good idea. Thanks for looking. G

Ute Mountain and a hay trough, no cattle.

Road G, Southern Colorado

Road G, in Southern Colorado. One of my favorite roads, not only as it’s my initial ‘G’, but because it was the road that carried me to the San Luis Valley for the first time in 1990. From Wild Horse Mesa in the east, I could look southwest to Ute Mountain, west to the Rio Grande and north through the valley to the 14,000 foot snowy peaks. And beyond, as far as the eyes could see! My parents were with me on that first trip. Every time I head into this area I carry a little part of them with me on my initial road! Thanks for looking. G

Road G, in Southern Colorado.

Nesting, Swainson’s Hawk, San Luis Valley

Nesting, Swainson’s Hawk, in the San Luis Valley, southern Colorado, from a few years ago now. I still head to this location but the nest and the tree are long gone. It feels much more remote than it used to without this tree. This was the only time I saw a hawk nesting here. I know that raptors abandon nests for the parasites to die off, only to return to it in another season. So it was wonderful when my friend Mark Collins and I spotted it occupied by this Swainson’s Hawk after a number of years. Stay safe and well in your nest. Thanks for looking. G

Nesting, Swainson's Hawk, San Luis Valley

Red Barn, Revisiting, Under Rain Clouds

Red Barn. Revisiting this favorite old barn in the San Luis Valley to continue documenting it’s demise, this time under threatening rain clouds. It rained heavily, shortly after this shot, which sent me ducking quickly back into the car. It then snowed for a while on the way home. Not too bad a day, though, despite the weather on the road in southern Colorado. Thanks for looking. G

Valley Homestead, Beyond The Fence

Valley homestead, beyond the fence in the San Luis Valley. If you are familiar with my work and my website you’ll recognize this old dwelling. Over the years the fence has also featured prominently in my images. Someone, at some point in time, peeled back the barbed wire in order to get access to the building. Personally, I like to document these abandoned homesteads from pretty much the same perspective for continuity and posterity. Here’s another view. Thanks for looking. G

Valley Homestead, Beyond The Fence